Cami Shaskin

Violin Blog


About


This blog is about all things violin. It is meant to educate, inspire, and provide resources for parents, teachers, and students. The author takes full responsibility for the viewpoints expressed here. In instances where she quotes ideas from others, she pledges to cite her sources as fully, responsibly, and accurately as possible. Topics will include book reviews, technique tips, entertaining anecdotes, quotes, jokes, educational findings, instrument care suggestions, violin in the news, repertoire lists, etc.

Cami J. Shaskin graduated with her master's degree in Music Education in 2008. Violin has always been her primary instrument, since beginning private lessons at age five. See camishaskinviolin.com/info for her music résumé, or click on Spotlights for historical recordings. Cami has enjoyed an array of experiences in writing, from penning award-winning articles as a journalism staff writer in high school, tutoring peers at BYU's Writing Center, earning a Writing Fellows scholarship and a minor in Language and Computers, and later becoming a published author. She recently picked up web programming as a hobby, earning a certificate in Web Programming and Development from the local community college. This blog has been a collaborative effort between her and her husband, who is a Web Developer by profession. Together, they designed and coded this blog and its original content "from scratch."

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2021
    Jan
        16 - Welcome to My Blog
        23 - Violin Teaching Kits
        30 - The Power of Inspiration
    Feb
        06 - Valuable Techniques
        07 - From the Top
        13 - In Honor of Valentine's Day
        20 - Violin Jokes
        28 - Beginning Orchestra Teaching
    Mar
        06 - Singing in Orchestra
        13 - Nurtured by Love
        21 - Helpful Websites
        27 - Unique Case Uses
    Apr
        02 - Favorite Music Quotes
        10 - All About Tone
        17 - Unique Composer Stories
        24 - Teaching Values
    May
        02 - Believing Teachers?
        15 - Violin in Art & Architecture
        23 - A Solo Repertoire List
        29 - Our Quartet
    Jun
        20 - Theft and Other Lessons
        26 - Violin Bridge Tips
    Jul
        07 - Clever Violin Memes
        20 - Horses and Lions
    Aug
        04 - Music During Covid
        16 - Favorite Music
    Sep
        12 - Being There
    Oct
        16 - Sight Reading Tips
    Nov
        05 - Why It's the Frog
    Dec
        20 - Bach on the Brain
        30 - Impact for Life
2022
    Jan
        23 - Tendonitis Helps
    Feb
        21 - An Old Performance
    Mar
        23 - Cars3 & Coaching
    Apr
        28 - Buying a Violin for Dummies
        29 - Preferred Brands
    May
        27 - Love: A Calling
    Jun
        20 - Gratitude for Idaho Shop
    Jul
        19 - Violinist Interviews Books
    Aug
        08 - Music Opens Doors
        23 - Top Classical Tunes for Violin
    Sep
    Oct
        11 - 100 Days of Listening
    Nov
        27 - Useful Analogies
    Dec
        28 - A Humorous Anecdote
2023
    Jan
        14 - Favorite Concertos & Sonatas
    Feb
        15 - Our Commonality
    Mar
        10 - Extras
        18 - Autopilot
    Apr
    May
    Jun
        06 - Motivation
        07 - Starting Lessons Again
    Jul
        08 - A Tale of Three Cloths
    Aug
        26 - The Ink
    Sep
        23 - Raw and Real Recital Reactions
    Oct
        18 - In Honor of Halloween
    Nov
        26 - Music Copyright
    Dec
        13 - Memes: Fun Facebook Finds
2024
    Jan
        15 - Fame and Fortune
    Feb
        05 - Details and the Big Picture
    Mar
        14 - Intermission
    Apr
        18 - A Day in the Life
    May
        02 - Oops!
    Jun
        14 - A Science or an Art?
    Jul
        15 - A Difficult Post
    Aug
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    Sep
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    Oct
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    Nov
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    Dec
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Posts


Music Copyright
26 Nov 2023
Did You Know the Following About Music Copyright?

  1. At least in the United States, whenever you produce an original creative work in tangible form, you automatically have a copyright on that work. This applies to written sheet music and sound recordings. Source: “What Musicians Should Know About Copyright” article and video on US Copyright Office website, accessed 11/25/23. (See link here.)
  2. When you wish to produce a recording of someone else’s musical work, provided it is not in the public domain (more on this in a minute), you need a license, which is permission from the publisher, or composer, to do that. You are supposed to get permission even if you aren’t making a profit from it. For anything involving video, you need a sync license, and for audio-only, you need a mechanical license. Initial source: My friend Kerstin Tenney, who obtained all necessary permissions for her recent album release.
  3. If a work is in the public domain, it means it is no longer protected by copyright. Copyright typically expires 70 years after the composer’s death. So all that Mozart and Debussy and Brahms you are performing is just fine without permission. This is your safest bet in regards to performing classical music; stick with the old stuff!
  4. Fair Use: If someone was to take you to court over a copyright infringement, you might have a chance under this clause. From Section 107 of the U.S. Copyright Act:

    In determining whether the use made of a work in any particular case is a fair use the factors to be considered shall include—
    • the purpose and character of the use, including whether such use is of a commercial nature or is for nonprofit educational purposes;
    • the nature of the copyrighted work;
    • the amount and substantiality of the portion used in relation to the copyrighted work as a whole; and
    • the effect of the use upon the potential market for or value of the copyrighted work.

    • By the way, for the second point, the nature of the copyrighted work, “using a more creative or imaginative work (such as a novel, movie, or song) is less likely to support a claim of a fair use than using a factual work (such as a technical article or news item).”

  5. From a guest lecturer, who was an expert on copyright, when I attended graduate school: you can generally photocopy and distribute one page [and one page only] from a method book, without breaking copyright, if the material is to be used exclusively for educational purposes.
  6. My recent experience with copyright: I decided to apply for a sync license to be able to indefinitely keep my video of my September 2023 recital, which I titled “Embarking!,” on my YouTube channel. Fifteen minutes of my 90-minute program were protected under copyright. After reaching out to various agencies and choosing one that I was told had more conservative pricing, when I found out that I would only be able to get a license for three years at a time, and that it would cost $700 to license those two pieces each time I reapplied, my husband and I decided it wasn’t worth the cost! My desire to have my video available was based on the guess that thirty or so people would stumble across my video in that length of time, without being charged anything to watch, so $700+ out-of-pocket seemed like an especially unreasonable expense. But I believe in following the law. Consequently, instead of paying for the publisher permission to use the copyrighted work, I took down my publicly-accessible videos for on-demand streaming on YouTube. For use of my Highlights Video on the video section of my teaching website, I edited out the three minutes containing copyrighted material, featuring only snippets from the works I performed that were in the public domain. The video is under the Spotlights section, accessed from the main menu of this site. I’ve also included that ten-minute video here:
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